Sun and beer

The afternoons in Lisboa are lazy when there’s sun and beer and good friends are around. Lourenço came to visit Lisboa. I had not met him since he was in Sweden. And now, we could meet under the sun of our native country. He brought his entourage, which made the day more special. We were supposed to go visit Sebastião Salgado’s exhibition – Génesis – but it was too crowded, so we took a detour to the Clube Náutico de Belém.

Clube Náutico de Belém, beer, tremoço, Lisbon Psych Fest, Lisboa

While I had spent the morning learning about the rule of thirds in Nelson’s workshop, the afternoon was all about getting to know some fine people and learning, for instance, about psicofarmacologização (yeah!), Lisbon Psych Fest (unfortunately over by now, but be on the lookout for the next year’s edition), the escalavardo, a mongoose-like beast that sucks the blood out of the chickens in the heights of Monchique, and how to properly pour green sparkly wine – do it from a height, to take some of the rougher gas away.

escalavardo, Benfica, Lisboa

Welcome back any time Lourenço!

Rule of thirds

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras

The Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva (Historic House Museum of artist Vieira da Silva) has a year-long program of sketching workshops, held on saturdays every two weeks, in cooperation with several members of Urban Sketchers Portugal (myself included). The themes are quite diverse so, even if you’re an experienced sketcher, there’s something for you.

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras, Vicente

I decided to attend Nelson Paciência‘s workshop a few days ago, titled “How much stuff fits in my sketchbook”. Fitting title for a sketcher who skillfully cramps stuff in the small canvas of his sketchbook.

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras, Vicente

He showed us how to use this cramping style, and suggested several techniques to help us in the process. One is to deform the subject to the canvas. Another one is to turn the head and look at more than just the view in front of you. Another yet is to keep out the stuff you don’t want to sketch, so that you get more free space for the stuff that matters. Here he is, stating that he “likes to squish heads”. Game of Thrones style?

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras

He then proceeded to teach us how to use the famed photographers rule of thirds to our advantage. A simple layout device that allows us to direct the focus of the viewer to what we want to give focus to. And this is when we – the students – sprung into action. We had to make a few sketches based on the rule of thirds, with different focuses, foregrounds and backgrounds, etc.

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras

It was a pleasant morning to learn and practice something new. Quite challenging also! On my way home, this Fiat 126 was waiting for me to sketch it.

Fiat, Fiat 126, Amoreiras, Lisboa, vintage cars

A hell of a couple of performances

sketchers, Dsenho Cru, raw sketching, Martim Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal

A room full of sketchers eagerly awaited the two performers of the Desenho Cru session of March. Some of them had heard that they were in for a special surprise. Warm up took some time as one of the performers couldn’t make it. A substitute had to be found.

Viktorija Tumaite, make-up, Lithuania, sketchers, Dsenho Cru, raw sketching, Martim Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal

Viktorija came to the rescue. The make-up artist from Lithuania turned into her own model and demonstrated on herself the transformation of make-up. She showed the long process women go through privately or in pairs, in bathrooms, languidly and meticulously, sipping red wine and enhancing her red lips, in front of 20-something sketchers. All the while, in the backstage, a different make-up strategy was taking place.

sketchers, Dsenho Cru, raw sketching, Martim Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal, Kina Karvel

Suddenly, and after headlamps were distributed, the lights were out! A chilling, shrieking, spooky song started in the background. A horned silhouette approach from the outside. It came to the center of the stage, dark robes absorbed all the light. Its red eyes gleamed as the demonic figure threatened to impale all of the sketchers to their seats with a blood-stained pike. Pens and pencils were in awe of the imposing and macabre visage of Kina Karvel, demon-performer of the night.

sketchers, Dsenho Cru, raw sketching, Martim Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal, Kina Karvel

After the music was over, suspension of disbelief was broken, as the demon started speaking in an unexpectedly high-pitched voice, and proceeded to strike a few poses during the following hour or so.

sketchers, Dsenho Cru, raw sketching, Martim Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal, Kina Karvel

It was some impressing minutes, those of Kina Karvel’s performance. Hard to picture them in a sketchbook.

Desenho Cru – Raw sketching

tavern, mustard, mayonnaise, chili sauce, beer, art, studio, mirror

In 2012, Desenho Cru was created as a one-night monthly gathering of artists and performers, in the unusual stage of a gay bar in the heart of Lisboa. It was actually named after the bar. The drill is simple: the performers perform, and the artists sketch them. Creative spirits in both sides of the (imaginary) fence are free to deliver their own art in whatever form they feel is best.

Veronique, performer, performance, Desenho Cru, model, mirror

Now, the Desenho Cru sessions are held in a small studio in Martim Moniz, another heart of Lisboa – the multi-hearted city. I attended my first Desenho cru in the beginning of february, weeks after coming back to Lisboa. It’s a fantastic group experience, where concentration levels are high, but everything feels somewhat different from a regular sketch meeting.

Veronique, performer, performance, Desenho Cru, model, mirror

The intimacy of the moment is enhanced firstly by the narrowness of the space, where fifteen to twenty people elbowed each other for some arm movement space. If more were to come, they would have to sit on the floor.

Veronique, performer, performance, Desenho Cru, model, mirror, José Gomez, guitar, music

Secondly by the unusual nature of the performances – and those are entirely dependent on the performers themselves – it’s an artistic lottery. You get what they bring for you. First-time performer Veronique, tense at first, on account of the thirty-something eyeballs on her, finally let herself and some garments go, and played around with postures and the mirror she had leaned up against the wall. I’d say she managed quite well.

Desenho Cru, mirror, José Gomez, guitar, music

The andalucian José Gomez brought his guitar and some electronic equipment that, for some reason, started to fail him right in the middle of his act. The gadget recorded a sample that he would play, and then it would playback on a loop, while he added some more samples to the texture of the song. A one man band, fretted unfortunately by faulty equipment.

Classical ballet

The awesome cooperation between Urban Sketchers Portugal and the Dance School of the Conservatory (EDCN) allows for sketchers to attend some of the classes and doodle the classical ballet and contemporary dance students in action.

ballet, EDCN, dance, classic, dance school, class, students, Conservatory

Taking advantage of this very intimate hours of these youngsters feels very weird at first – like an invasion of a private moment and space. But soon after the concentration levels are high, everyone just minds their own business and focus on what they love best – the students, the sketchers, the dance teacher, even the pianist who’s setting the tune for the whole act.

ballet, EDCN, dance, classic, dance school, class, students, Conservatory

It’s an extraordinary weekly opportunity for sketchers to grasp the shape and movement of bodies in their finest moment. Although it is very challenging at first, the exercise pays off in the end. It’s also an excellent visual memory stimulant, to save in the mind’s eye a single pose, or a single movement in the myriad of elegant steps and twirls these students undertake for the three hours of the duration of the class.