A year of sketching for the future

Eduardo Salavisa, Jardim das Amoreiras, Casa Museu Vieira da Silva, workshop, sketching

Eduardo Salavisa is a monthly instructor in the year-long program of sketching workshops organized by the Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva (Historic House Museum of artist Vieira da Silva).

Eduardo Salavisa, Jardim das Amoreiras, Casa Museu Vieira da Silva, workshop, sketching

His workshops endeavor to map the area around Amoreiras public park. In the february workshop, he challenged us to sketch the same subject three times in a row, using different levels of detail.Eduardo Salavisa, Jardim das Amoreiras, Casa Museu Vieira da Silva, workshop, sketching

The first sketch had to be done in 2 to 3 minutes. The second one in 10 minutes. And the last one in half an hour. Most of the color was added indoors, afterwards.Eduardo Salavisa, Jardim das Amoreiras, Casa Museu Vieira da Silva, workshop, sketching

Poland sketches #7 Music in Krakow

Excerpt of my text in Diários de Viagem 2 (Travelling journals 2) freely translated from the original Portuguese:

street singer, street musician, opera, music, Krakow, singer, Poland

“I like to focus in people, in their facial features – a legacy from Hugo Pratt, who used to study the features of the different peoples in his stories. The opera-singing lady in a street corner in front of the Church of St. Andrew in the Old Town of Kraków abused her features in a lofty exaggeration.

Sofia, fado, fadista, Poland, Krakow, Piękny Pies, music, Talking Dog, nightlife

Whereas Sofia, a portuguese girl we stumbled upon rehearsing for a mini fado show a few minutes later, expressed herself subtely with proud postures and slight movements, traits of a proper fado singer.”

Sofia, fado, fadista, Poland, Krakow, Piękny Pies, music, Talking Dog, nightlife

Lisboa in the turn of the century

The 20th century, that is.

Lisboa City Hall is promoting an activity amongst the Portuguese Urban Sketchers community that focuses on a list of 19th to 20th century threatened buildings. The aim is to attract attention to these buildings, alerting the civil society about the dangers of letting these gems perish.

My contribution to the common effort is a portrait of a former industrial building known as “A Napolitana“, a pasta factory, built in 1908, in the industrial area of Santo Amaro. It’s one of the first examples of food production mechanizing and one of the last remaining specimens of its kind. Santo Amaro became a fully integrated part of the city and is no longer industrialized, but many buildings in the area still preserve industrial archetypes. It is built in yellowish brick, an uncommon material in Lisboa, and its façades are decorated with small tile panels.

Napolitana, factory, building, architecture, Lisboa, Portugal, Santo Amaro, Alcântara, 20th century, tiles

Most of the residential buildings around the area are former workers’ houses. Lately, the area has been subject to a mild gentrification, mostly due to LXFactory, another former factory that has been converted into a design district and offices.

Poland sketches #6 Food in Krakow

Excerpt of my text in Diários de Viagem 2 (Travelling journals 2) freely translated from the original Portuguese:

Polakowsky, Krakow, Poland, food, milk bar, bar mleczny

“In Poland, food is cheap and delicious! Partly due to the many Soviet-era Bar Mleczny (milk bars), a kind of social canteen for workers that used to be subsidized by the state, serving cheap and nourishing meals in a grey, depressing atmosphere, mostly with one-seat tables. Polakowski is an ultra-decorated modern interpretation of these characteristically Polish establishments. The dishese, simple, but heavy on the cream, dairy and cabbage, featuring chunky kielbasas, pungent bigos, rough golanka or pasty pierogi, are ideal for workers, students, pensioners, or weary travellers.

zapiekanka, Krakow, Poland, food, snacks, hole-in-the-wall, street food

After a few beers and wódkas, late in the evening, the simple, ubiquitous zapiekankas become intelligentsia-worthy delicacies, equivalent to Sweden’s falafels or the Portuguese bifanas.”

Krakow, Poland, food, street food, hamburger, snacks, hole-in-the-wall

Poland sketches #5 Sights of Krakow

Krakow, Poland, Wawel, cathedral, Katedra Wawelska

Kraków is definitively more touristy than Warszawa. The medieval town’s survival during WWII made it possible for the city to skip the soviet-style modernist renovation and helped preserve the atmosphere of a historical European city, with all the layers of the preceding epochs in plain view. The historical center is peaceful, if a tad busy with mostly Russian and other European tourists going about. It was at a time, the capital city of Poland, until Sigismund III Vasa, part of a Swedish dynasty of kings moved the capital to Warszawa, to be closer to all the territories that the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth ruled over.

Krakow, Poland, hot chocolate, chocolate, Wedel

Kraków’s historic center (the Old Town, Kazimierz and Wawel) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since ’78 and was one of the first of its kind. The cultural DNA of the city feels very different from that of Warszawa, partly because while Warszawa was closer to Russia, Sweden and Germany, and prey to their invading armies, Kraków was closer to the Habsburg Empire’s ambitions.