Patio-houses of the Öresund region

In the eastern section of Lund lies a neighbourhood called Planetstaden. It’s pretty much a cul-de-sac with one street that loops around 45 houses on a few hectares of land. Still, those houses hold great interest, because they comprise a housing complex designed by Jørn Utzon, the famed danish architect who came to design Sydney Opera House just a few years later.

Planetstaden by Jørn Utzon

Utzon presented this model of houses in a Skåne competition and applied the same project to four distinct locations around the Öresund, both in Sweden and Denmark (Lund, Helsingør, Fredensborg and Bjuv). The houses are inspired by danish barns, a patio with house on two sides and walled on the other two, so that further construction in each patio does not affect the exterior design. But this construction might as well (and probably was) inspired by mediterranean or chinese or middle-eastern patio-houses. It’s such a successful concept that it’s difficult to find a culture that hasn’t absorbed it.

Planetstaden by Jørn Utzo

The low-pitched inward-facing roof brings to mind some coastal town houses of the Mediterranean Sea or even the ancient roman colonial villas. The wide windows are easily identified with nordic or maybe japanese architectures. That special yellow-coloured brick makes us think about the rammed earth buildings of Yemen or Mali. It is an international design, no doubt, but also very much local. It is a design that is simultaneously vernacular and modernist. And apart from a few outside air conditioning units, it still preserves its original unity.

Portraits at Martas #4

Marie was a fanzine author who visited our stall when the Seriefest was at the library next door. We started talking about how she’d met Stockholm urban sketcher Nina Johansson before and was wondering if I had knew of her. Soon after, Holger took on the conversation with her, which left me free to portrait her. She had a really nice colour to her hair.

Marie Flood

Portraits at Martas #3

The last workshop was attended by Teresa – co-founder of local project Fruktsam – and Daniel. Both were really enthusiastic with the blind sketching exercises and in about one hour and four drawings later, their concentration was paying off. Results were showing and they were realizing that drawing has a lot to do with careful observing and that it is within reach. Thus was the mythical wall of talent cracked.

Teresa and Daniel

This was my blind portrait of them, while they concentrated on each other.

Portraits at Martas #2

Heidi and Amelie

The time spent at the workshops at Marta’s were peppered with visits from friends and family. Amelie and Heidi gladly took pens and pencils and started producing art – no directions required!

Patrick and Liam

 

Later, Patrick, Melissa and Liam popped up for fika. Melissa gave it a shot at some blind drawing exercises and was cursing me soon enough. It’s a tough one for starters! That reminds me: I should revise my drawing teaching program one of these days.

Melissa, Patricia and Liam

I had a blind drawing go at her also.

Portraits at Martas #1

During the exhibition, Holger and I were at Marta’s leading informal workshops about our own particular way of sketching. This gave us a chance to get to know how people relate to sketching, how do they feel about it, and if they would consider starting to sketch themselves.

During some of those gatherings, I got the chance to make some portraits. Here’s a chubby version of Patrícia.

Patrícia

Alex is a 10 year old boy that likes to draw sharks! Pity I didn’t get to keep one of his drawings.

Alex