The human puxada

The human puxada

Puxada is a Portuguese word that means "pulled". It also used to describe the incredible entanglements of power and communication cables fixed on the façades of most buildings in Portugal. Some puxadas are true works of art, testaments to the improvisation capability of our tech people. Whether you're changing your internet provider, or you're upgrading your switchboard, another layer is added to your puxada in a process that will allow future electronic archaeologists to know exactly what were your options in terms of commodities. A few years ago, I challenged the Urban Sketchers Portugal community to…Read more
Adventures in technicolor

Adventures in technicolor

It's been a month now since Marina Grechanik's workshop in Lisboa and it's still kicking in. I've been experimenting a lot with ecolines, waterwashes as sketching base, big contrasts and form simplification. There's actually not much story about these two spreads. Just a bunch of people I don't know from the subway, the tram and the street. And a bunch of people I do know, in a bar. In a mixture of techniques very unlike me. Oh, and a couple dancing lindy hop. Or jitterbug. I keep forgetting which. Have a colorful weekend everyone!  Read more
Around the Sado estuary

Around the Sado estuary

A couple of friends were spending the weekend in a hotel in Azeitão, in the Setúbal peninsula, the large land platform between the Tejo and Sado estuaries. It is a complex territory, known for being heavily industrialized, but strangely enough, also for its vineyards and for being a haven for sun-seekers and nature-lovers. There are all kinds of small towns and villages, each with its own quirks and traditions. Further south, either by driving around or by crossing the Sado estuary, lies a strip of shiny thin sand more than sixty kilometers long, starting…Read more
Poland sketches #9 Jewish Quarter

Poland sketches #9 Jewish Quarter

Excerpt of my text in Diários de Viagem 2 (Travelling journals 2) freely translated from the original Portuguese: "The visit to the New Jewish Cemetery, deep in the heart of the Kazimierz district had, ironically, wiped away the specter of death. A peaceful chaos of tombstones blended with nature. For many minutes, we were alone in the dead quiet alleyways, until the arrival of a small horde of Israeli orthodox jews, teenagers, clumsy, euphoric with their trip down history lane." They were actually looking for the tombstone I had chosen as a foreground to my sketch.…Read more
Poland sketches #8 Auschwitz

Poland sketches #8 Auschwitz

Excerpt of my text in Diários de Viagem 2 (Travelling journals 2) freely translated from the original Portuguese: "Wandering around Krakow, one can easily feel the presence of the Jewish history and culture. But its gloomiest landmark is actually outside of the former capital, in a small town of Oświęcim, infamously known by its german name Auschwitz, and its extension, Camp 2 - Birkenau. The reasons to visit the old concentration camps are probably manyfold, as are, undoubtedly the reasons for not visiting them. But it's only after visiting them that the reason becomes apparent. It's a…Read more