Rule of thirds

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras

The Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva (Historic House Museum of artist Vieira da Silva) has a year-long program of sketching workshops, held on saturdays every two weeks, in cooperation with several members of Urban Sketchers Portugal (myself included). The themes are quite diverse so, even if you’re an experienced sketcher, there’s something for you.

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras, Vicente

I decided to attend Nelson Paciência‘s workshop a few days ago, titled “How much stuff fits in my sketchbook”. Fitting title for a sketcher who skillfully cramps stuff in the small canvas of his sketchbook.

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras, Vicente

He showed us how to use this cramping style, and suggested several techniques to help us in the process. One is to deform the subject to the canvas. Another one is to turn the head and look at more than just the view in front of you. Another yet is to keep out the stuff you don’t want to sketch, so that you get more free space for the stuff that matters. Here he is, stating that he “likes to squish heads”. Game of Thrones style?

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras

He then proceeded to teach us how to use the famed photographers rule of thirds to our advantage. A simple layout device that allows us to direct the focus of the viewer to what we want to give focus to. And this is when we – the students – sprung into action. We had to make a few sketches based on the rule of thirds, with different focuses, foregrounds and backgrounds, etc.

Nelson Paciência, Urban Sketchers Portugal, sketching, workshop, sketching workshop, Casa-Museu Vieira da Silva, Lisboa, Amoreiras

It was a pleasant morning to learn and practice something new. Quite challenging also! On my way home, this Fiat 126 was waiting for me to sketch it.

Fiat, Fiat 126, Amoreiras, Lisboa, vintage cars

Distilling for the soul

dorna, Monchique, Alferce, medronho, firewater, barrels, tradition

In the south of Portugal, high up in Monchique, the rooftop of Algarve, the accent tends to steal a few letters from each word. Destila, the process of distilling, becomes Estila. And in Monchique especially, the estila has to do with a particular kind of fruit – the medronho – which turns it into a mildly sweet and fruity firewater (aguardente) named after the very own fruit.

A small band of regional Urban Sketchers put together a series of sketch meetings in a couple of distilleries, deep in the woods of the Monchique mountain range. The first distillery, and by far, the most interesting one, has had the same process for ages, the traditional way!

medronho, Monchique, distillery, tradition, copper, alembic, firewater

The fruit ferments in gigantic barrels called dornas for a few months. Then, the resulting paste (massa) is transferred with a large copper ladle (cácero) to a round copper vessel (barriga) which is attached to a copper alembic. The whole device is inserted into a masonry furnace, heated by firewood. As the distilling process begins inside the copper alembic, the precious transparent fluid pours down a pipe that goes through a massive ceramic tank, filled with running fresh water, to cool it down. It might have been more efficient to have a spiral tube going down a narrower tank, but as the distillers explained, the spiral tube would create more challenges to the cleaning process. More cons than pros. Scratch that!

What comes out of the other end is a deliciously fruity smooth rich-bodied transparent medronho that wraps up the meals of most homes in Algarve. It’s also a deceivingly treacherous liquid, as it is so smooth and tasty, you don’t realize you’re having an alcoholic beverage until it’s too late!

chouriço, recipe, sausage, chorizo, tradition

The distilling of one batch can take up to four hours, so the crew finds ways to entertain themselves throughout the day. This particular fella shared his own technique of properly roasting a chouriço: wrap it up nice and tight in brown paper; put it on the ground and cover it with ash; cover the ash with glowing embers. Wait until you feel it right; take out, unwrap, slice in medallions, serve with traditional Monchique sliced bread; wash down with medronho. You’ll be happy for the remainder of the day, no matter what.

lunch, sketchers, Urban Sketchers, Monchique, Alferce

ooh Porto brand and stationary

ooh Porto is an innovative tourist service that provides customized tips and recommendations to visitors to the portuguese city of Porto. It’s a kind of local buddy who figures out what each individual visitor likes and recommends the most interesting options to visit, eat and have fun, based on their profile. The idea is all about personalized service.

Find out more at www.oohporto.com

The logo and corporate identity were thought to be part of the experience and the storytelling of the concept behind ooh Porto. the symbol represents a path that meanders around, shaping the type of the logo, before finally reaching the destination – a classical “X” to mark the spot. It can read as a map to your future journey in Porto, all the while you’re being amazed by all that you see.

The logo, brand and stationary were designed in cooperation with Eduarda Loureiro, designer.

ooh Porto, design, tourism, Porto, Oporto, Portugal, logo

 

ooh Porto, design, tourism, Porto, Oporto, Portugal, logo

ooh Porto, design, tourism, Porto, Oporto, Portugal, logo